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Climate Solutions Now Act amended, passed by Maryland House

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A lengthy debate in the House on Tuesday led to the passage of legislation known as the Climate Solutions Now Act. | PDF: Climate Solutions Now Act of 2022 (Senate Bill 528) The Senate bill covers a lot of ground, but it has been significantly amended. So even though it passed the House on Tuesday, it now returns to the Senate for one more vote, and is likely to be sent to the governor. gas emission. Bill’s supporters point to the impact of climate change and how it shows no signs of slowing down. They said rising sea levels continue to flood coastlines, storms are getting more powerful and severe drought conditions threaten the property. The Senate Climate Solutions Act currently under consideration aims to combat climate change by dramatically reducing the state’s carbon footprint. reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60% by 2031. It requires large commercial buildings and multi-family dwellings to reduce emissions by 20% by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2040. Additionally, the state should undertake efforts to electrify school buses and state-owned vehicles. The bill no longer requires the construction of net-zero school buildings, but the amended bill provides financial assistance to local school districts that do so as an incentive. As amended in the House, the legislation removes the requirement that restaurants and other foodservice venues reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. A marathon debate in the House centered on nearly two dozen Republican amendments, and e Arguments fell with the parties. “It’s kind of silly of us to think that unilaterally our actions are going to have a significant impact on what people express as global climate change,” said House Minority Leader Jason Buckel, R -District. 1B. “We can’t pretend we’re not trying to get out of fossil fuels. We are. That’s the name of this game,” said Charles County Steward CT Wilson, D-District 28. The bill’s sponsor, Prince George’s County Sen. Paul Pinsky, D-District 22, said he hopes the measure reaches the governor in time to override his anticipated veto before the end of the session.” (The governor) will have his six or seven days to decide whether to sign it or veto it. I’m expecting the latter based on his comments, and we’ll have the opportunity to override that veto and pass it into law,” Pinsky said. The bill passed both houses with a margin. veto.: “This legislation puts the state on a path to decarbonization and will reduce Maryland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions over the next 20 years. We owe it to future generations of Marylanders to address the root causes of stronger storms, rising sea levels and higher temperatures that threaten their quality of life and this bill is a step important in this direction. We look forward to the bill officially becoming law. CBF thanks the House leaders and delegates who helped defend this bill against several weakening amendments. »

A lengthy debate in the House on Tuesday led to the passage of legislation known as the Climate Solutions Now Act.

| PDF: Climate Solutions Now Act of 2022 (Senate Bill 528)

The Senate bill covers a lot of ground, but it has been significantly modified. So even though it passed the House on Tuesday, it now returns to the Senate for one more vote, and is likely to be sent to the governor.

Lawmakers said the proposed bill significantly accelerates efforts to reduce the use of fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Proponents of the bill point to the impact of climate change and how it shows no signs of abating. They said rising sea levels continued to flood coastlines, storms were growing more powerful and severe drought conditions threatened property.

The Senate’s Climate Solutions Now Act, currently before the House, aims to fight climate change by dramatically reducing the state’s carbon footprint.

The legislation is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60% by 2031. It requires large commercial buildings and multi-family dwellings to reduce emissions by 20% by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2040. And, the state must begin electrifying school buses and state-owned vehicles.

The bill no longer requires the construction of net-zero school buildings, but the amended bill provides financial assistance to local school districts that do so as an incentive.

As amended in the House, the bill removes the requirement for restaurants and other food service establishments to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

A marathon floor debate in the House focused on nearly two dozen Republican amendments, and arguments aligned along party lines.

“It’s kind of silly of us to think that unilaterally our actions are going to have a significant impact on what people are expressing as global climate change,” said House Minority Leader Jason Buckel, R-District 1B .

“We can’t pretend we’re not trying to get out of fossil fuels. We are. That’s the name of the game,” said Charles County Steward CT Wilson, D-District 28.

The bill’s sponsor, Prince George’s County Sen. Paul Pinsky, D-District 22, said he hoped the measure would reach the governor in time to override his planned veto before the end of the session.

“(The Governor) will have his six or seven days to decide whether to sign it or veto it. I expect the latter based on his comments, and we will have the opportunity to override that veto and get adopted,” Pinsky said.

The bill passed both houses without a veto.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation released a statement saying, “This legislation puts the state on a path to decarbonization and will reduce Maryland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions over the next 20 years. We owe future generations of Marylanders to address the root causes of stronger storms, rising sea levels and higher temperatures that threaten their quality of life and this bill is an important step in that direction. looking forward to the bill becoming official law. The CBF thanks the House leaders and delegates who helped defend this bill against several weakening amendments.”