Home Greenhouse Pulp Mill in Northwestern British Columbia Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Recycling Waste Wood Fiber – Terrace Standard

Pulp Mill in Northwestern British Columbia Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Recycling Waste Wood Fiber – Terrace Standard

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A forestry group near Hazelton has succeeded in significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions by reducing battery combustion and sending residual wood fiber to coastal pulp mills for recycling.

As part of this project, 1,050 trucks of residual wood fiber from NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd are delivered to Kitimat. Pulp logs purchased by All West Trading Limited are barged to coastal pulp mills for use in pulp, paper products and green energy.

NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd was able to do this with a grant of $ 484,164 from the Forest Enhancement Society of BC (FESBC).

According to NorthPac CEO Cathy Craig, the project is a step towards helping the province and Canada’s climate change goals by preventing an estimated 42,000 cubic meters of pulp logs from being burned in the forest. .

“Our FESBC-funded project has enabled us to increase the overall recovery of fiber from our forests in the region, resulting in greater availability of logs for domestic pulp producers and a reduction in the amount of biomass. burnt every year, ”said Cathy Craig, CEO, NorthPac Forestry Group Ltd.

Residual wood fiber waste, which has very low economic value, must legally be burned to reduce the risk of forest fires. The operating cost is high for other solutions for skidding, processing, loading, transportation and increased road maintenance. The challenge is more real in the Kispiox region where there are few wood processing facilities and a forest dominated by low value hemlock.

The project also contributes to local and provincial economies, said FESBC director of operations Gord Pratt.

“The project was carried out by a team of local logging and trucking contractors, and it has contributed to the regional economy of northwestern British Columbia,” said Pratt. “It’s a win-win because it creates not only economic benefits for local communities, but also for the global environment.”